Recently MNPG Emerge talked with co-founder, Lisa Harouni of Digital Forming,  “a 3D software house that is revolutionizing product customization.” First a video introducing the company and then to the interview. Enjoy!

Can you please talk about your background as a designer?

I am not a designer. I started my career at Deutsche Bank in the Global Economics team, then left to start my own fashion distribution company which I was involved in for 5 year. I founded and now run Digital Forming, which was established 3 years ago with 3 partners: Assa Ashuach, Dr Siavash Mahdavi and Nicolas de Cordes. If you would like a designer’s perspective, Assa is the one to speak to!

What kind of 3D printing does your platform offer?

We offer access to every kind, from Laser Sintering in plastics and metals (precious and semi precious included), to processes that allow for additive production in materials such as ceramics, resins, and chocolate.

How is Digital Forming different then other rapid prototyping businesses?

We are one of the first UK companies to offer software solutions for Additive Manufacturing machines. Our focus is to offer businesses and designers tools to allow them to exploit Additive Manufacturing for the mass customisation of lifestyle products, using the technology for direct production as opposed to prototyping.

What has been your favorite thing to work on in recent months?

Our soon-to-launch co-design platform that will allow businesses and designers to create customisable products over the web without needing a development team, and in turn, invite their customers to tweak / personalise these virtual products and produce them on-demand at the click of a button. Visit: www.ucodo.com

The site will be changing in March to something very exciting!! Stay tuned!

Is there any new aspect of this industry that you would like to be a part of?

Getting more 3D printers (and associated tools) in schools and universities.

When do you think there will be a 3D printer in everyone’s home?

I think we are some way away from that. First, I envisage local 3D print shops around the corner!

How would you encourage printers making the transition from hobbyist to professional?

It’s all about the quality of production and freedom of design.

What is your favorite part of working with objects?

Seeing an idea born and brought to life in a number of hours!



© 2012, by Naoya Hatakeyama 

Established in 1895, the Venice Biennale continues to be one of the most respected cultural institutions. Initially launched as an International Art Exhibition, the Biennale eventually expanded into other areas such as music, cinema, theatre, architecture, and dance.

The Architecture Exhibition, one that I follow closely, was launched in 1980. It is one of the most important event on the architectural calendar. This year, David Chipperfield was appointed as the Director and Curator for the Architecture Exhibition. The exhibition titled Common Ground will present 69 projects, with participants from the likes of Toyo Ito (Awarded Best Pavilion 2012 for his Japan Pavilion shown in the image above)

David Chipperfield speaks about Common Ground:

“We began by asking a limited group of architects to develop ideas that might lead to further invitations: everyone was asked to propose a project along with a dialogue that reacted to the theme and showed architecture in its context of influence and affinity, history and language, city and culture.

 

We want to emphasise the common ground that the profession shares, notwithstanding the apparent diversity of today’s architectural production. The sharing of differences is critical to the idea of an architectural culture.”

The exhibition is open until 25 November 2012.


© 2012, by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

The twelfth commission for the annual summer Pavilion at Serpentine Gallery in London (June 1st – October 14th, 2012) is designed by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei. For the first time, the entire interior is made of cork and can hold up to 200 people. Above the Pavilion’s round steel roof lays a thin layer of water (25mm) that reflects the surroundings and the changes in the skyline.

The design is a response to the previous pavilions like from Frank Gehry and SANAA. This year, the architects and artist gave a new life to the past memories of former pavilions, by constructing on site and utilizing ghosts of each pavilion to form what is there today. Each pavilion from year 2000 to 2012 is given a column within the space of the pavilion, with each post extruding out of the foundation and the twelfth column as a part of this commission.